Colma Creek Connector

The Colma Creek Connector project seeks to build resilience while enhancing public access along South San Francisco’s Colma Creek.

View the final Colma Creek Connector Report

Originally named “Resilient South City” during the Resilient by Design Challenge, the Colma Creek Connector project focuses on habitat restoration and public access along South San Francisco’s Colma Creek and better connections to the Bay shoreline. Following the Resilient Bay Area challenge, two grants were awarded to support this phase of the project: an SB1 Adaptation Planning Grant via Caltrans with support from MTC and BARC, and a Priorities Conservation Area (PCA) grant via MTC and the State Coastal Conservancy. In June 2020, the Hassell Team released its final Colma Creek Adaptation Planning Report. A higher resolution version of the report is also available.

The report puts forth adaptation concepts for the Colma Creek corridor in South San Francisco, between Orange Memorial Park and the Bay Trail. Sections of this corridor experience flooding and the community has limited access to a shoreline blocked by transportation infrastructure and industry. This project seeks to transform the current concrete flood control channel that is Colma Creek into more of an asset for the community, while also enhancing community access for walking and biking to the Bay shoreline through a series of active public spaces along Colma Creek and recommended improvements to circulation.

The Hassell Team also conducted public engagement to build awareness of Colma Creek and gain input on adaptation options, including holding community outreach events and walking tours of Colma Creek with youth from South San Francisco, as well as the creation of a children’s book entitled Christina Lives by a Beautiful Creek, available for download in English and Spanish.

Inside the green cities revolution

Richard Mullane, who led the Colma Creek Connector project for Hassell, recently penned an article in Innovators Magazine highlighting the project and the broader role of design in achieving our international goals of ecosystem restoration and sustainable development. View the article by clicking here.