The Bay Area highway most exposed to sea level rise

An interactive article in the San Francisco Chronicle today highlights the North Bay's State Route 37, perhaps the stretch of highway in the Bay Area most threatened by rising sea levels. SR 37 is bellwether for the costly and complex issues the region will face as sea level rise, combined with high tides, already threatens to flood the roadways and nearby farms.

What Can the Bay Area Do About Rising Seas? East Palo Alto Has a Few Great Answers

A recent article in KQED News showcases East Palo Alto's community-led efforts to adapt to climate change. The town of 30,000 is one of the most vulnerable localities to rising sea levels in the Bay Area; two-thirds of the city could experience regular flooding within a decade and high-tide inundation by mid-century. East Palo Alto is also a community of color, with a 66% Latino population and a significant number of Pacific Islanders, some of whom previously fled rising seas in the South Pacific.

Stinson Beach to devise sea-level rise defense plan

Stinson Beach is launching a multi-year effort to create a sea level rise adaptation plan, as reported by the Marin Independent Journal. The plan would determine how and when the community, which is the most threatened on the Marin ocean coastline, can protect itself against sea levels that could rise by up to 10 feet by the end of the century. The plan would be completed in 2024 and include a list of potential projects and funding options.

How COVID Put a $10 Billion Emergency on the Back Burner

A recent article by NBC Bay Area highlights how the Covid-19 pandemic, and the ensuing fiscal crisis, has resulted in a number of critical climate adaptation projects and initiatives being delayed or put on hold as local, regional and state government budgets are squeezed. The article highlights a number of projects and policies to cope with climate impacts that have been delayed due to Covid-19, including a $4.7 billion climate resilience bond proposed by the Governor's office that was shelved.

SF Bay is rising - are we moving fast enough to adapt?

An article published in the San Francisco Chronicle today underscores the urgent need for action to address sea level rise on the Bay Area's 400 miles of shoreline, the costs of which could approach $100 billion over time. The article highlights some of the innovative financing and regulatory developments that have occurred to facilitate adaptation actions, with a specific focus on wetland restoration to create buffers against rising seas.